Can You Freeze Matzo Balls?

Matzo balls are a delicious and very satisfying dumpling that are traditionally put into a Jewish chicken soup. They are a staple food item for Passover time and taste absolutely amazing. People often wonder can you freeze matzo balls. There are often lots of them leftover so it would be handy if you could!

The Quick Answer

Can You Freeze Matzo Balls?

You can freeze matzo balls for up to 3 months. They are usually served with soup and you can also freeze this. You do need to freeze them separately but both of these are easy to do.

You can use the links below to jump through this article if you need help with how to go about freezing matzo balls, how to defrost them or whether it’s actually worth doing in the first place:

How to Freeze Matzo Balls

Matzo balls are fairly easy to freeze, but you have to double freeze them for the best results. Just follow this method, and you can freeze your matzo balls ahead of time and get yourself prepared in plenty of time when you need them. Just follow these instructions to make sure you have a handy stash of Matzo balls in the freezer.

  1. Make Matzo Balls
    Make your matzo balls according to your favourite traditional recipe. Once they are made, they are ready to freeze.
  2. Spread Matzo Balls Out on a Tray
    Pop some parchment paper onto a flat baking sheet. Then place the matzo balls onto the baking sheet carefully. You need to make sure they are kept apart so that they are not touching each other. This step helps to ensure that your matzo balls freeze separately and don’t end up all clumped together in a big mushy mess.
  3. Flash Freeze
    Place the baking sheet into the freezer for an hour or two or until the matzo balls are frozen.
  4. Bag Up
    When the matzo balls are solid, you can take them out of the freezer and transfer the matzo balls from the baking sheet into a large freezer bag.
  5. Seal
    Squeeze the bag so that all the air is squeezed out. Then seal it tightly.
  6. Label
    Label with the name of the contents and the date. You want to make sure you know when to use them by.
  7. Freeze
    Pop the bag into the freezer until you need some matzo balls.

How to Freeze Matzo Balls Soup

The soup that matzo balls are served in is usually a delicious chicken soup made with chicken fat known as schmaltz. You can also freeze the soup, but you should keep the matzo balls separate from the soup in the freezer.

  1. Cool Soup
    Make your soup and allow it to cool completely.
  2. Find Suitable Containers
    Decide whether you want to freeze the soup in portions or if you want to freeze in one large amount. You will need suitable containers that can be sealed tightly to do this.
  3. Portion Out
    Ladle the soup into the container. Leave a couple of inches at the top free so that the soup can have room to expand as it freezes.
  4. Seal
    Pop the lid onto the container and put a freezer bag around it for a little extra security from spills.
  5. Freeze
    Add a label with the contents and the date and put the soup into the freezer.

2 Tips for Freezing Matzo Balls

Now you know how to freeze them, we’ve got our 2 top tips which we strongly recommend following when freezing matzo balls to have the best results:

  • Keep Them Protected – If you want to ensure a little extra protection in the freeze for your dumplings, you could use a sealable container instead of a freezer bag. Once you have frozen them on the baking tray, you can transfer them into the container, ensuring they don’t get squashed in the freezer.
  • Suck Air Out – Keeping your matzo balls airtight is the way to keep your matzo balls tasting as amazing as possible. If you are using a freezer bag, you can keep them a little extra airtight by popping a straw into the bag and sucking the air out before sealing it. If you have a vacuum sealer at home, you could use that instead, but a straw works almost as well.

How Long Can You Freeze Matzo Balls?

Both your matzo balls and the soup they are served in can be frozen for up to three months. Perfect for leftovers or to ensure you are well prepared before Passover and have some on hand for when you most need them.

You Can Freeze Matzo Balls for up to 3 Months

How Do You Defrost Matzo Balls?

You have a couple of options when it comes to defrosting your matzo balls and soup. For best results, you can defrost both the balls and the soup by taking them out of the freezer and popping them into the fridge to thaw out slowly overnight.

Another option is to thaw out the soup first by putting it into the fridge for a day before you need it. When you heat the soup, you can pop some frozen matzo balls into it and allow them to defrost, and then heat up as you cook the soup.

Can You Refreeze Matzo Balls?

We would not recommend that you refreeze either your matzo balls or your matzo ball soup. The soup is made from meat fat and stock, and you do need to be careful when it comes to freezing animal products because of the harmful bacteria that may end up growing on the food.

Your matzo balls may well freeze the first time successfully, but once they have been cooked and processed, they are likely to have changed in texture and quality and may not be as tasty if you tried to freeze them again.

Do Matzo Balls Freeze Well?

Matzo balls freeze fairly well. There may some change in texture, but the taste should be absolutely fine, and by the time they are cooked in the soup, you shouldn’t even be able to tell the difference between matzo balls that have been frozen and those that have been made freshly.

Related FAQs

If you’ve still got questions about freezing matzo balls or matzo in general, then these may help:

Can You Freeze Matzo Crackers?

It is perfectly safe to freeze matzo crackers, but it can ruin the texture, so try to consume them without needing to freeze them. You can also freeze matzo cracker dough before baking a batch if you decide to make your own. 

Can You Freeze Matzo Meal?

There is no need to freeze matzo meal – it would be like freezing flour. It has an exceptionally long shelf life, provided that it is stored in an airtight container away from light and extreme temperature changes. 

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