Can You Freeze Haggis?

Haggis is an iconic Scottish dish that is traditionally eaten on Burns Night, but it is a great meal to have all year round. Haggis with neeps and tatties ( swede and mash) and served with a healthy portion of gravy is perfect for a warming meal on cold autumn and winter nights. It can be easy to buy or cook up a little too much haggis, which is why you are here! You must be wondering, can you freeze haggis?

The Quick Answer

Yes, you can freeze haggis. Haggis can be frozen for around 4 months. You can freeze both whole, unopened haggis as well as leftover haggis. You cannot, however, freeze precooked haggis.

Made with lamb, mixed with spices and flavourings as long as you haven’t bought a precooked and reheated haggis there is no reason you shouldn’t be able to freeze your haggis.

You can freeze it whole and straight from the shop or freeze any leftovers you have for a later date. So let’s take a look at how you can freeze this delicious savoury pudding:

How To Freeze Haggis

Haggis is an easy dish to freeze. If you have bought it in a store and the packaging is still sealed, then you can pop the whole thing straight into the freezer. Just make sure you label it with the date first, so you don’t forget when you need to eat it.

If you have made your haggis at home, these are the methods to use to freeze the haggis.

How to Freeze Whole Haggis

  1. Cool
    Allow your haggis to cool completely. You can keep it in the lining, whether you have used a traditional sheep’s stomach or an artificial lining.
  2. Wrap
    Wrap the cooled haggis in cling film. You need to wrap several layers around the haggis. Pop the haggis into a freezer bag.
  3. Label
    Label the bag with the dates and the contents. You can even add some baking or reheating instructions to make it a little easier when you come to use the haggis.
  4. Freeze
    Pop the haggis into the freezer and freeze.

How to Freeze Leftover Haggis

You should only use this method if your haggis has been made fresh and cooked at home. If you have store-bought your haggis, then it may already have been cooked, cooled and reheated once so you shouldn’t freeze and then reheat again.

This amount of heating and cooling can help bacteria to grow in the haggis, which could make you sick. If you are confident it’s safe to freeze your leftovers then this is the method to use:

  1. Cool
    Allow your haggis to cool completely.
  2. Prepare Containers
    Prepare some airtight containers or freezer bags. The best option for leftovers is to freeze in separate portions, so you need a bag or container for each portion. Then when it comes to using the haggis, it makes it much easier for you to get just the right amount out of the freezer.
  3. Label
    Label the bags or containers with the date and contents.
  4. Portion into Bags
    Spoon a portion of haggis into each container or bag.
  5. Freeze
    Seal the containers or bags tightly and pop them in the freezer.

2 Tips for Freezing Haggis

Now you know how to freeze it, we’ve got our 2 top tips which we strongly recommend following when freezing haggis to have the best results:

  • Check the Packet – If you have bought the haggis from the shop and have already opened it then check the packet to see what it says about freezing it. If the haggis has been cooked during the production process then it may state it is not suitable for home-freezing.
  • Wrap It Tightly – Keeping the air out will prevent the haggis from drying out so make sure you wrap it tightly in cling film. To be safe, wrapping it twice is far from a bad idea. 

How Long Can You Freeze Haggis?

Haggis keeps fairly well in the freezer and lasts for about four months. After this time, you might find the texture degrades and the taste of the haggis changes.

If you leave it in the freezer for too long, then you might even get that freezer burn taste that no one enjoys!

You Can Freeze Haggis for Around 4 Months

How Do You Defrost Haggis?

To avoid the food deteriorating then your best option for defrosting is to use a slow method. To do this, you need to pop the haggis into the fridge and allow it to defrost slowly.

If you are defrosting a whole haggis, this could take twelve hours. Small portions will take a little less time.

Using this method helps reduce the number of bacteria that can grow, which helps to keep the haggis a little safer to eat.

Can You Refreeze Haggis?

Meats should never be refrozen, whether that chicken, sausage meat or beef… And haggis is no different. It is when food is heating and cooling that bacteria can grow in the food, and doing this too often could make you ill.

It would be best if you were especially careful with food like haggis because, when bought from a store, there is a chance it has already been cooked once, and you will be reheating it. If this is the case you shouldn’t even freeze the haggis once, never mind twice! 

If in doubt it’s best to be safe and throw away any haggis you have leftover that can’t be eaten.

Does Haggis Freeze Well?

Haggis does freeze well! We can’t say there will be no taste or texture change at all because freezing does change food, but it shouldn’t be noticeable, and the haggis will be just as enjoyable as it was fresh!

Related FAQs

If you’ve still got questions about freezing haggis or haggis in general, then these may help:

Can You Freeze Black Pudding?

So you want to freeze black pudding too? The good news is yes, you can freeze black pudding, and it actually freezes really well. You need to wrap it in clingfilm and then store in the freezer.

If, however, you want a little more information, then read out guide to freezing black pudding.

Can You Freeze Black Pudding

Can You Freeze Vegetarian Haggis?

Yes, you can get vegetarian haggis, and yes, you can freeze it. Both meat and vegetarian varieties contain oats, and they freeze in much the same way. In fact, most of the rules on this page can be applied to vegetarian haggis when it comes to freezing it.

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